Update on FCC Privacy Rules

24 01 2018

Ava Childers

We previously reported on the FCC’s 2016 Privacy Order, “Protecting the Privacy of Customers of Broadband and Other Telecommunications Services” impacting Internet service providers’ data privacy practices and obligations and the corresponding timeline for compliance. Intervening events, however, have made the rules imposed by the 2016 Privacy Order moot. On June 26, 2017, the FCC adopted a new order providing guidance on reinstating the pre-2016 Privacy Order regulations. This order was issued pursuant to a joint resolution of Congress under the Congressional Review Act, signed by the President on April 3, 2017, disapproving the FCC’s 2016 Privacy Order. As a result, the 2016 Privacy Order has “no force or effect.” FCC Chairman, Ajit Pai, stated that the purpose of the new order is to “simply make clear that the privacy rules that were in effect prior to 2016 are once again effective.”

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Senate Dismantles FCC Broadband Privacy Rules

3 04 2017

Today the Senate voted to roll back the FCC’s broadband privacy rules which require internet service providers to obtain consumers’ consent for accessing sensitive information and required consumers to be notified of any data breaches. Senator Edward Markey (D-MA) blasted the vote stating that it is “Now easier for American’s sensitive information about their health, finances and families to be used, shared, and sold to the highest bidder without their permission.” EPIC had urged the FCC to establish comprehensive safeguards for consumer privacy.

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Push for Internet Privacy Rules Moves to Statehouses

3 04 2017

Push for Internet Privacy Rules Moves to Statehouses

3/26/2017

Conor Dougherty

New York Times

    In the face of the Senate’s rollback on regulations preventing ISPs from monetizing information like a user’s browsing history, states like Illinois are now making moves towards increasing protections of their citizens’ privacy. In the case of Illinois, a “right to know” bill is in considering, which would “let consumers find out what information about them is being collected by companies like Google and Facebook, and what kinds of businesses they share it with.” Additionally, Illinois is looking to restrict smartphone tracking by applications in addition to audio recordings from TVs and wifi-enabled personal assistants.

    Obviously, other states could easily look to these laws should they be passed, hopefully spreading further than just Illinois. This would additionally make it more difficult for companies to work around, requiring specific features on a per-state basis. These laws, of course, fly in the face of what large corporate entities like Microsoft lobby for.

    While I’m appreciative of local state legislature for privacy, these laws feel a lot more like band-aids than legitimate solutions for the US. Protecting only a fraction of the country on a state-by-state basis is not ideal in that it creates pockets of lowered privacy. While it sounds ideal that other states may simply just adopt laws that Illinois or California have recently begun to push for, these regulations are the kind that should benefit all Americans, rather than just Illinoisans or Californians. If the majority of states prove that privacy is important to them and both the left and the right can prove that they can come together on these issues, there’s no reason that it should not just be the law of the land.

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What to expect now that Internet providers can collect and sell your Web browser history

3 04 2017

After Congress handed President Trump legislation Tuesday that would wipe away landmark privacy protections for Internet users, we received a lot of reader questions about what happens next. The legislation makes it easier for Internet providers, such as AT&T and Verizon, to collect and sell information such as your Web browsing history and app usage. But let’s get into the details: You wanted to know whether the measure could help the government dig up dirt on people. You asked how to protect your privacy. And some of you even asked if it would be possible to buy up the online browsing histories of Trump or members of Congress.

No, you won’t really be able to buy up President Trump’s browser history

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The content in this post was found at https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2017/03/29/what-to-expect-now-that-internet-providers-can-collect-and-sell-your-web-browser-history/ Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post. and was not authored by the moderators of privacynnewmedia.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.

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FCC Chairman Goes After His Predecessor’s Internet Privacy Rules

28 02 2017

FCC Chairman Goes After His Predecessor’s Internet Privacy Rules

2/24/2017

Alina Slyukh

NPR

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    Chairman Ajit Pai, the Republican chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (and known opponent of net neutrality), has ordered others at the FCC to hold on the employment of certain aspects of new privacy rules meant to go into effect in the coming week. These rules mandate informing customers of Internet Service Providers’ collection and usage of their data.

The content in this post was found at http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/02/24/517050966/fcc-chairman-goes-after-his-predecessors-internet-privacy-rules and was not authored by the moderators of privacynnewmedia.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.

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