Facebook has been sharing our data for months to help study income inequality

22 02 2018

Facebook has agreed to give a hotshot Stanford economist unprecedented access to its internal data as a way to better understand income disparity in the United States.

According to Politico, which first broke the news on Tuesday morning, the investigation will be led by Raj Chetty, who won a 2012 MacArthur Genius grant and is well-known for his analysis of America’s social and economic problems. Facebook did not immediately respond to Ars’ request for comment, but the company “confirmed the broad contours of its partnership with Chetty” to Politico.

“We’re using social networks, and measuring interactions there, to understand the role of social capital much better than we’ve been able to,” Chetty told the political news site in January.

It is not clear exactly what data Facebook has made available to Chetty and his researchers or how personal and private information would be protected. The study has apparently been already underway for at least six months, however.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/02/facebook-has-been-sharing-our-data-for-months-to-help-income-inequality/Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post. and was not authored by the moderators of privacynnewmedia.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Supreme Court Leaves Data Breach Decision In Place

22 02 2018

The Supreme Court has denied a petition for a writ of certiorari in Carefirst, Inc. v. Attias, a case concerning standing to sue in data breach cases. Consumers had sued health insurer Carefirst after faulty security practices allowed hackers to obtain 1.1 million customer records. EPIC filed an amicus brief backing the consumers, arguing that if “companies fail to invest in reasonable security measures, then consumers will continue to face harm from data breaches.” The federal appeals court agreed with EPIC and held that consumers may sue companies that fail to safeguard their personal data. Carefirst appealed the decision, but the Supreme Court chose not to take the case. EPIC regularly files amicus briefs defending standing in consumer privacy cases, most recently in Eichenberger v. ESPN, where the Ninth Circuit also held for consumers, as well as Gubala v. Time Warner Cable and In re SuperValu Customer Data Security Breach Litigation.

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The content in this post was found at https://epic.org/2018/02/supreme-court-leaves-data-brea.html Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post. and was not authored by the moderators of privacynnewmedia.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.

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Mountain of sensitive FedEx customer data exposed, possibly for years

16 02 2018

Ars Technica

Passports, driver licenses, and other sensitive documentation for thousands of FedEx customers were left online, possibly for years, in a blunder that left the information available to identity thieves and other malicious actors, researchers said Thursday.

In all, Kromtech Security Center said, researchers found 119,000 scanned documents stored in a publicly available Amazon S3 bucket. The photo ID scans were accompanied by completed US Postal Service forms that included names, home addresses, and phone numbers of people who requested to have mail delivered by an authorized agent.

“Citizens from all over the world left their scanned IDs—Mexico, Canada, EU countries, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Japan, Malaysia, China, Australia—to name a few,” Kromtech researchers wrote.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2018/02/fedex-customer-data-left-online-for-anyone-to-rifle-through/

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Why cops won’t need a warrant to pull the data off your autonomous car

14 02 2018

 Ars Technica

Lt. Saul Jaeger, who commands the traffic unit at the Mountain View Police Department, remembers the first time a few years ago when he was given a demo of Waymo’s self-driving cars.

Jaeger was not only interested from a professional point of view, but also as a citizen. After all, he lives in Mountain View near one of the Waymo facilities. He watched in awe as the engineers showed him the autonomous vehicle’s (AV) own view. This screen reduces everything to line drawings and other simplified sensory inputs.

“It’s incredible,” he told Ars. “It felt like The Matrix, when they flip the switch—it’s seeing everything, it’s seeing way more than you or I can—and it’s making decisions.”

Jaeger, a veteran of the department, said that as someone whose job requires that he “reconstruct” serious traffic accidents, he could only dream of a machine that captured as much as an AV does.

“I felt like I was in heaven,” he said. “It’s like instant replay in the NFL, I can tell what happened. The engineers looked at each other like, ‘Aw, crap.'”

Instantly, Jaeger realized that the promise of AVs to not only be safer for those inside the car, but it may also, potentially, be a way for law enforcement to collect data and information about everything else around it.

For now, law enforcement in one major hub of AV development and testing seems to have few clear ideas as to how they will integrate these vehicles into their traffic enforcement practices, much less their investigative process.

But AVs could soon become—absent a notable change in the law—a TiVo-on-the-ground. In other words, as auto manufacturers and tech companies race to take AVs mainstream, they may become a gold mine for law enforcement.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/02/why-self-driving-cars-may-be-heaven-for-investigating-crimes-and-accidents/ Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post. and was not authored by the moderators of privacynnewmedia.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Big businesses band together in urging lawmakers to sell out your privacy

4 02 2018

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The content in this post was found at http://www.latimes.com/business/lazarus/la-fi-lazarus-data-breach-notifications-20180116-story.html Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post. and was not authored by the moderators of privacynnewmedia.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.