Equifax’s massive 2017 data breach keeps getting worse

16 03 2018

March 1, 2018

Another 2.4 million people have now been affected by the incident, the credit agency says.This means that as many as 147.9 million consumers have been affected in some way by the breach, which amounts to about half the country.

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Appeals Court Revives Data Breach Suit Against Zappos

16 03 2018

A federal appeals court has ruled that consumers affected by a Zappos.com data breach have the right to sue the online retailer. The 2012 breach exposed the personal data of more than 24 million Zappos customers. A lower court previously held that the consumers lacked “standing” to bring a lawsuit against Zappos because their injuries were merely “conjectural.” But the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed that decision and allowed the case to continue. “With each new hack comes a new hacker, each of whom independently could choose to use the data to commit identity theft,” the court wrote.

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When Kids’ Toys Are Listening, the FTC is Watching

22 02 2018

IP Watchdog

Amanda G. Ciccatelli
February 21, 2018

Chinese toymaker VTech recently settled charges with the FTC in the first-ever case involving internet-connected toys. VTech became a victim of cyber attackers back in 2015, when hackers got access to the company’s online database and compromised accounts of over 11 million, which included data for about 6.37 million children.

Michael Bahar, head of Eversheds Sutherland’s U.S. Global Cybersecurity and Privacy Practice, and former General Counsel to the House Intelligence Committee, and Mitzi L. Hill, technology partner at Taylor English Duma LLP, sat down with IPWatchdog to discuss this case and related concerns including: (1) how the FTC’s Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) update indicates a larger regulatory effort over Internet of Things; (2) why smart devices are more vulnerable to security threats and privacy issues than ever; (3) what kind of regulatory and legal efforts manufacturers can expect; and (4) how businesses can stay compliant with the FTC and protect themselves against cyber breaches.

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The content in this post was found at https://www.ipwatchdog.com/2018/02/21/kids-toys-listening-ftc-watching/id=93656/ Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post. and was not authored by the moderators of privacynnewmedia.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Facebook has been sharing our data for months to help study income inequality

22 02 2018

Facebook has agreed to give a hotshot Stanford economist unprecedented access to its internal data as a way to better understand income disparity in the United States.

According to Politico, which first broke the news on Tuesday morning, the investigation will be led by Raj Chetty, who won a 2012 MacArthur Genius grant and is well-known for his analysis of America’s social and economic problems. Facebook did not immediately respond to Ars’ request for comment, but the company “confirmed the broad contours of its partnership with Chetty” to Politico.

“We’re using social networks, and measuring interactions there, to understand the role of social capital much better than we’ve been able to,” Chetty told the political news site in January.

It is not clear exactly what data Facebook has made available to Chetty and his researchers or how personal and private information would be protected. The study has apparently been already underway for at least six months, however.

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The content in this post was found at https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/02/facebook-has-been-sharing-our-data-for-months-to-help-income-inequality/Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post. and was not authored by the moderators of privacynnewmedia.com. Clicking the title link will take you to the source of the post.



Why cops won’t need a warrant to pull the data off your autonomous car

14 02 2018

 Ars Technica

Lt. Saul Jaeger, who commands the traffic unit at the Mountain View Police Department, remembers the first time a few years ago when he was given a demo of Waymo’s self-driving cars.

Jaeger was not only interested from a professional point of view, but also as a citizen. After all, he lives in Mountain View near one of the Waymo facilities. He watched in awe as the engineers showed him the autonomous vehicle’s (AV) own view. This screen reduces everything to line drawings and other simplified sensory inputs.

“It’s incredible,” he told Ars. “It felt like The Matrix, when they flip the switch—it’s seeing everything, it’s seeing way more than you or I can—and it’s making decisions.”

Jaeger, a veteran of the department, said that as someone whose job requires that he “reconstruct” serious traffic accidents, he could only dream of a machine that captured as much as an AV does.

“I felt like I was in heaven,” he said. “It’s like instant replay in the NFL, I can tell what happened. The engineers looked at each other like, ‘Aw, crap.'”

Instantly, Jaeger realized that the promise of AVs to not only be safer for those inside the car, but it may also, potentially, be a way for law enforcement to collect data and information about everything else around it.

For now, law enforcement in one major hub of AV development and testing seems to have few clear ideas as to how they will integrate these vehicles into their traffic enforcement practices, much less their investigative process.

But AVs could soon become—absent a notable change in the law—a TiVo-on-the-ground. In other words, as auto manufacturers and tech companies race to take AVs mainstream, they may become a gold mine for law enforcement.

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